Lucy Long Ago

Lucy Long Ago: Uncovering the Mystery of Where We came From by Catherine Thimmesh

hominid book cover

BIBLIO: 2009,HMH Books for Young Readers, Ages 8 to 13.
REVIEWER: Gwen Harter.
FORMAT: Middle Grade book
ISBN: 9780547051994

Thimmesh brings Lucy, the ancient hominid, to in an easily readable book. This novel introduces basic paleontology and anthropology concepts to the novice reader. Scientific approaches to fossilization, excavating, casting fossils, dating fossils, reconstruction in all senses of the word, are explained in layman’s terms. There is a fascinating discussion about Lucy and how she fits into the evolutionary theory and the human’s ancestral tree. Even more fascinating is the sculptural representation of Lucy that John Gurche took fifteen months to create. The intricate and time-consuming description of his work sounds marvelous to look at in person, even though the pictures in the book do it plenty of justice.

The book is thin, consisting of only sixty-three pages including a list of sources and the index. Addressing six simply posed questions this book breaks up complicated and disputed theories into simple to understand statements. There are many high quality photos in the book ranging in size from one fourth of a page all the way up to a double page spread. Accompanying the photos are simple representations of some of the scientific procedures, such as how to cast a fossil, and how sediment buries the bones and fossilizes them.

As interesting as this book may be to look at, it lacks the substance needed to entertain most people. I would recommend this book to girls and boys in grades 5-8. This book was written with a certain narrative-like feel and did not contain enough hard facts to be used as a supplemental academic material or for any real curious reader looking for anything of substance. I would not recommend this book as you could probably find out more from an article in a magazine like National Geographic. It would not be worth the money and time spent to put it on the library shelf.

Z for Zachariah

Z for Zachariah by Robert C. O’Brien

scared girl book cover

BIBLIO: 1975,New York: Atheneum,Ages 13 to 16.
REVIEWER: Gwen Harter.
FORMAT: Young Adult book
ISBN: 978-1416939214

In a post-apocalyptic world sixteen year old Anne Burden lives by herself in a secluded valley minimally affected by the nuclear fallout, tending her family farm and occupying her time with her journal (the novel itself). Having spent a whole year in isolation she is surprised when a strange man, Mr. Loomis, arrives in the valley with a [hazmat] suit and Geiger counter, cautious she avoids him at first but when he falls ill she returns to aid him to health. In his feverish outbursts she finds out his troubled past with Edward to the point of murder. When he regains his health Anne becomes wary and runs away when he tries to take advantage of her, avoiding him but hoping to coexist in the valley though that plan gets cut short when he tries to track her with the dog and maim her to prevent her escape. In a resolute action Anne flees the valley with Mr. Loomis’s stolen supplies looking for another valley hoping to find a future as a schoolteacher. The book was written and presumably set in a Cold War time period. It appears that this simple book, at one point, would have been relevant and entertaining to teenage girls and some boys but not to the 21st century reader. Some of the details seem outdated and in some ways too convenient, not to mention the characters seem logical but act inconsistently. I would not actively recommend this title, instead I would offer Life as We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer, which is a similarly apocalyptic series set realistically in the modern day.